Project 2: Week 4 Summary (Production)

This week, we have finalized the pre-production paperwork for our project and even got started on the actual filming for our video piece.

In terms of the pre-production paperwork, I managed to complete the shot schedule as well of my shooting script for our video which contained: the duration for each shot, the type and content of each shot and the dialogue for each shot as well. This was in order to gain an idea of what shots would make the piece look interesting and relate to the topic and mostly to take with us to ensure we gain the correct number, duration and content of each shot as well. This would be to avoid not getting enough of each shot type, avoiding not filling the 2 minute duration for the final piece, wasting time if this happens, and also getting the wrong shots in general.

Even though both types of pre-production paperwork are very similar in terms of purpose and content, the main difference is that the shooting script features the shot number for each shot as well as the action occurring in each shot and the dialogue- whether it is a voice-over or taking to the camera live.

Below is my Shot schedule along with the Harvard references afterwards:

 

Time Shot type Image Script
0.00-0.04 seconds Establishing shot An establishing shot of the Busy city centre with busses passing by. (Carris)- This is where we are now…
00.5-0.10 seconds Establishing shot Another establishing shot but of a nearby park which features squirrels (mainly grey). (Carris) But this is one of many places where the problem lies.
0.11-0.21 seconds Three sequence shot 1st– a mid-close up of plant bed area of the entrance.

2nd– another mid-close up of

3rd– a close-up shot of branches with leaves, which will become a focus-change shot (from near to far).

(Carris) Ever since the introduction of the Grey Squirrels during the 1870s (¹), the Red Squirrels have clearly met their match due to the other species’ powers to compete for food and natural resources.
0.22-0.34 seconds Full body shot A full body shot of me walking towards the camera in the same park location (Grace) Though sadly, this has had its consequences; there are a staggering less than 140,000 left in the UK today, from 3.5 million in the 1950s (²).
0.35-0.40 seconds Tracking shot

 

 

The tracking shot of Carris and I walking along the path of the park (Grace) This is a result of the Red squirrels becoming out-competed by them…
0.41-0.44 seconds Close-up shot A close-up shot of my hand on the computer mouse. (Grace) …as well as catching what is known as ‘squirrel pox virus’ from the Grey Squirrels.
0.45-0.55 seconds Three sequence shot 1st– a close-up of the computer screen showing information on the Squirrel pox virus.

2nd– a mid-close up from behind of Carris and I looking at the information on the screen. The focus changes from far to near.

3rd– a mid-close up of a side view of Carris and I looking at the screen.

 

(Carris) This virus is passed on in a way that means it’s totally immune to the Grey Squirrels, whereas it can be lethal to Red squirrels.
0.56-0.1.02 seconds Close-up shot A close-up shot of the computer screen showing the Wildwood Trust page on Red Squirrels. (Carris)But are these the only reasons that these species have become endangered over recent years..?
1.03-1.10 seconds A mid-close up/focus-change shot A mid-close up from behind the computer we were using which changes focus from near to far. (Grace) We were lucky enough to meet… of the Wildwood trust in Kent to investigate more upon this matter.
1.11-1.30 seconds Rule-of-thirds shot A rule-of-thirds shot showing an interview with the member of the wildlife trust. “………….”
1.31-1.41 seconds Three sequence shot 1st– A mid-close up of water running out from the water fountain

2nd– A focus-change shot from a college bench showing tree leaves blowing.

3rd– A close up of Carris in the college library reading a mammal book.

“………….” (until the tracking part at approximately 1.40 seconds)
1.42-2.00 seconds Full-body shot A piece-to-camera of Carris in the library next to a bookshelf. (Carris) So there we have it, after what has been said today, we can only think positive about the future of these little creatures in relation to what is being done and will be done to help them.

 

References:

  1. Unknown surname, C. (2008). How did the grey squirrel arrive in the UK? co.uk, http://www.woodlands.co.uk/blog/flora-and-fauna/how-did-the-grey-squirrel-arrive-in-the-uk/# [accessed 21st January 2015].

 

 

  1. Coles, J. (2015). How conservation is Saving Britain’s red squirrels. BBC-Earth, http://www.bbc.co.uk/earth/story/20150924-how-conservation-is-saving-our-red-squirrels [accessed 5th January 2016].

I have also finished the scripting from my 2 minute radio piece which consisted of: the duration of each piece of audio, the audio itself and also any background audio, sound affects and music. The purpose of this was essentially for the same purposes as the shot schedule for the video, as it will help me get the timing for my dialogue correct (since I timed it whilst I was writing it up) and I can refer to it along the way as I edit it all together.

 

Here is my shooting script:

project 2 Shooting Script

 

Shot No. Action/audio Dialogue / Commentary / Sound
 

1

(Establishing shot) The city centre of Canterbury with busses passing by.

 

(Audio) faint noises of the busy high street with buses passing by.

 

(Voice over- CARRIS) This is where we are now…
 

2

(Establishing shot) A nearby park which features squirrels (mainly grey).

 

(Audio) the faint background noises of wind blowing and very minimal sound from the traffic

 

(Voice over- CARRIS) But this is one of many places where the problem lies.
 

3

(Three sequence shot):

1st– a mid-close up of plant bed area of the entrance.

2nd– another mid-close up of

3rd– a close-up shot of branches with leaves, which will become a focus-change shot (from near to far).

 

(Audio) wind and nature sound effects slowly black out.

(Voice over- CARRIS) Ever since the introduction of the Grey Squirrels during the 1870s (¹), the Red Squirrels have clearly met their match due to the other species’ powers to compete for food and natural resources.
 

4

 

(Full body shot) me walking towards the camera in the same park location.

 

(Audio) due to dialogue being spoken live to the camera, wind and leaves quietly crunching can be heard alongside my voice.

(Live audio- GRACE) Though sadly, this has had its consequences; there are a staggering less than 140,000 left in the UK today, from 3.5 million in the 1950s (²).
 

 

5

(Tracking shot) Carris and I walking along the path of the park.

 

(Audio) The conversation between Carris and I can be heard beneath the voice over.

(Voice over- GRACE) This is a result of the Red squirrels becoming out-competed by them…
 

6

(Close-up shot) my hand on the computer mouse.

 

(Audio) No audio.

(Voice over- GRACE) …as well as catching what is known as ‘squirrel pox virus’ from the Grey Squirrels.
 

7

(Three sequence shot):

1st– a close-up of the computer screen showing information on the Squirrel pox virus.

2nd– a mid-close up from behind of Carris and I looking at the information on the screen. The focus changes from far to near.

3rd– a mid-close up of a side view of Carris and I looking at the screen.

 

(Audio) No audio.

(Voice over- CARRIS) This virus is passed on in a way that means it’s totally immune to the Grey Squirrels, whereas it can be lethal to Red squirrels.
 

8

(Close-up shot) The computer screen showing the Wildwood Trust page on Red Squirrels.

 

(Audio) No audio.

(Voice over- CARRIS) But are these the only reasons that these species have become endangered over recent years…?
 

9

 

(Mid-close up) behind the computer we were using which changes focus from near to far.

 

(Audio) No audio.

(Voice over- GRACE) We were lucky enough to meet… of the Wildwood trust in Kent to investigate more upon this matter.
 

10

 

(Rule-of-thirds shot) showing an interview with the member of the wildlife trust. “………….”
11

 

(Three sequence shot):

1st – a mid-close up of water running out from the water fountain.

2nd– A focus-change shot from a college bench showing tree leaves blowing.

3rd– A close up of Carris in the college library reading a mammal book.

 

(Audio) The faint noises of wind blowing and the water fountain from outside. Audio cuts out when in the library.

“………….” (until the tracking part at approximately 1.40 seconds)
12 (Full-body shot) A piece-to-camera of Carris in the library next to a bookshelf.

 

(Audio) No audio.

(Live audio- CARRIS) So there we have it, after what has been said today, we can only think positive about the future of these little creatures in relation to what is being done and will be done to help them.

 

 

Below is my radio SFX script which i have also Harvard referenced at the bottom of it:

project 2 radio script

(Radio) SFX list and script:

Timing (seconds) Audio- Background sound effects, music. Script
0.00-0.08 No audio- until 0.06 seconds in which faint sounds of trees rustling and birds tweeting slowly creep in. The potential future of what we all know as the red squirrel is a constant ongoing debate and has been since they began their decline in the 1950s. (¹)
0.09-0.22 Wildlife- mild wind blowing in trees, birds tweeting Before then, they were a regular member of our woodlands, parks and even the cities we know of today. But where there’s a good, there’s a bad; the grey squirrels, which were native to North America at the time, were brought into the UK around 1876 as a method to bring some interest into the location (²).
0.23-0.36 Wildlife background sounds fade out slowly and fade out completely at 0.32 This has resulted in a severely worrying decline over the years in the number of red squirrels: from the 1950s when they started to show this negative effect, there were around 3.5 million in the UK- today, we’d be lucky if there are as many left as 140,000 (³).
0.37-0.52

 

Audio coming from outside with mumbling coming from the public. Many members of our towns and cities that have or had grey and red squirrels tend to believe that the grey squirrels’ powers to out-complete the red squirrels for food and resources. And they’re not wrong at all but it turns out that another major contributing factor to the red squirrels’ endangerment involves a very unheard of disease known as ‘Squirrel pox virus.’ (4)
0.53-1.02 Mumbling from the background continues until 0.57 In which I starts to fade out. This virus is passed on to the red squirrels from the grey squirrels-who are completely immune to it. As for the red squirrels though, all it means is bad news, and potential death.
1.03-1.19 The background noises of the wildlife trust staff talking occur but at a lower volume. But it may not be all bad news for the red squirrels; many wildlife trusts and organisations are working hard to reverse the effect of this endangerment. But like mentioned before: where there’s a good, there’s a bad; a number of places have resorted in grey squirrel-elimination acts such as removing them completely or even resorting in the culling of them (5).
1.20-1.45 No audio INTERVIEWEE: Talking about how the trust/other trusts are helping to save the red squirrels.
1.46-2.00 The audio of wildlife, birds whistling and trees blowing in the wind re-occur. Even though a positive can come with a negative, it can form back into a positive over time, as justified by the hard work being done to reverse the endangerment of red squirrels. With all the contributing factors towards their endangerment identified and the action towards these now being taken, the future of the red squirrels is leaning more on to the positive side of things.

 

 

References:

 

  1. Coles, J. (2015). How conservation is Saving Britain’s red squirrels. BBC-Earth, http://www.bbc.co.uk/earth/story/20150924-how-conservation-is-saving-our-red-squirrels [accessed 5th January 2016].

 

  1. Unknown surname, C. (2008). How did the grey squirrel arrive in the UK? co.uk, http://www.woodlands.co.uk/blog/flora-and-fauna/how-did-the-grey-squirrel-arrive-in-the-uk/# [accessed 21st January 2015].

 

  1. Coles, J. (2015). How conservation is Saving Britain’s red squirrels. BBC-Earth, http://www.bbc.co.uk/earth/story/20150924-how-conservation-is-saving-our-red-squirrels [accessed 5th January 2016].

 

  1. BBC News- Magazine (2015). The place that has wiped our grey squirrels. BBC News, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-34603394 [accessed 5th January 2016].

 

  1. BBC News- Magazine (2015). The place that has wiped our grey squirrels. BBC News, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-34603394 [accessed 5th January 2016].

 

It also turned out that the Wildwood Trust may not be the only interview we’ll have for our project; we both came across the Red squirrel Survival Trust (RSST) during our research and Carris had sent an email asking for an interview on the Red squirrels’ endangerment. This was a very positive result as one of the members of the trust got back to her that same day saying that it could work out.

Below is the email reply we got from the RSST:

RSST Email

This was when Carris forwarded me the email and we thought that a Skype interview would be a great idea because it would give us the perfect opportunity to properly engage with the RSST worker and gain the thorough information we would need for our video, radio and article. This was also When Carris sent the email suggesting the Skype interview and we got a reply shortly suggesting Monday next week.

As or my ‘to do’ list for next week, the first task will obviously be to start filming the shots within our outside location- one of them will be a park within the Canterbury city to show where Squirrels, including Red, used to but may still live. We will use the shot script and schedule to tick off which shots we complete and ensure that we have a few seconds extra of each shot than stated to make cutting and editing it more flexible.

In terms of last week’s to do list, we have both completed our tasks we set ourselves successfully which means that our outside shots and even Audio recording for the radio piece can now go ahead as of when appropriate. However, we have not managed to organise a travel route to the Wildlife (Wildwood) Trust yet because we haven’t had any confirmation over the interview plans yet. Even though we both knew thought it would be best to wait until we hear word from them with the dates, times and days they offer, which will help us to organise our routes from there, we needed confirmation sooner than we were waiting for because we had to get started on our production very soon. This was why we went on to the Wildwood website and Carris found the educational email address which she sent our email to. This was a massive problem and burden taken away from us because the trust now had two copies of the same email in case something happened to our first one and it may have been the more appropriate email adress to sent it to anyway.

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Project 2: Week 4 Summary (Production)

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