Final project 1: project brief and criteria checklist.

For my first final project, I have to create a magazine cover and a double page spread based on a chosen publication. I will have to plan, research and write out the content and the layout of both pieces. I also have to ‘show an awareness of how your planned and finished product fulfills the purpose of the publication you are emulating’, as well a detailing an understanding of the skills I’ve used in completing the cover and double page spread. This also includes how relevant they are to the journalism industry. I have to indicate which criteria each of my work covers.

Learning Outcome

Assessment Criteria

Covered

Unit 1

  1. Understand processes and technical skills used in creative media production.

1.1 Apply understanding of a range of processes to support media activities.

Using the software.

1.2 Apply media processes and skills safely and appropriately.

Producing the piece/making it.

2. Understand the characteristics and methods of communication within a media context.

2.2 Critically compare a

range of communication

methods used to convey meaning in creative media production.

Evaluating the style of the magazine, target audience. Comparing it to a rival (different brand)

Unit 2

1. Understand design and

research tools, methods and skills used in creative media production.

1.1 Critically compare a range

of research tools, methods and skills.

What would be the best way of conducting the research/why?

2. Understand primary

and secondary research sources.

2.1 Critically compare a range

of primary and secondary

research sources.

Which one would be the best for my project/why?

3. Be able to use design

and research tools,

methods and skills to

inform ideas for creative media production.

3.1 Apply design and

research tools, methods

and skills to record and

interpret information and

develop ideas for

creative production.

Conducting interviews (and recording it), gathering research and data.

3.2 Evaluate the effectiveness

of design and research

tools methods and skills

to develop ideas for creative production.

Evaluate it.

Unit 3

1. Understand progression

opportunities within the creative media sector.

1.1 Locate, access and use

information to support own development.

What jobs are there which theses skills could equip me to do.

2. Understand the skills

needed to pursue a career

in the creative media sector.

2.1 Critically evaluate a range

of working practices and

methods.

Identify/explain what skills/have skills used to create the spread and cover

2.2 Apply knowledge of

working practices to

support own

development.

Creating it and explaining the skills used during the process. Identifying what jobs use the skills I have used.

3. Be able to carry out roles

and responsibilities

consistent with

professional practice.

3.1 Organise self and work

to meet deadlines and

targets.

Set myself interim deadlines. Handing it in on time! Writing out my own evidence list.

3.2 Demonstrate

consideration and

professionalism in working

with others.

Conducting interviews/recording it with professionalism.

Unit 4

1. Understand critical

perspectives that

influence the analysis

of creative media

production active

ties.

1.1 Compare a range of

critical perspectives

that influence the analysis

of creative media

production activities.

Language, narrative, text, pictures, covers- how does it suit the target audience?  How does it achieve this?

1.2 Apply knowledge of

critical perspectives to

the analysis of a range

of creative media

production activities.

 Use these points from the chosen magazine publication to back them up.

1.3 Apply knowledge and

understanding of critical

perspectives to support

own practice.

Show how you have understood  points 1.1/21.2 to create my double page spread

2. Understand the contexts

within which creative

media technology and

production are positioned.

2.1 Critically compare a

range of contexts within

which creative media

technology and

production are situated.

Compare chosen publication with another existing rival and state the purpose of the chosen magazine/publication.

2.2 Apply an understanding

of a range of contextual

parameters to support

own creative

development.

2.2 Produce the double page spread and show an understanding of 2.1 to create it. Compare created final version with the original version.

Learning Outcomes

Assessment Criteria

Evidence to be produced

Completed

Unit 1:

1. Understand processes and technical skills used in creative media production.

1.1 Apply understanding of a range of processes to support media activities.

1.2 Apply media processes and skills safely and appropriately.

1.1 Evidence needed includes proof of using the software to produce the final piece.

1.2 This means producing the final piece using the appropriate skills and software.

Learning Outcomes

Assessment Criteria

Evidence to be produced

Completed

Unit 1:

1. Understand processes and technical skills used in creative media production.

1.1 Apply understanding of a range of processes to support media activities.

1.2 Apply media processes and skills safely and appropriately.

1.1 Evidence needed includes proof of using the software to produce the final piece.

1.2 This means producing the final piece using the appropriate skills and software.

2. Understand the characteristics and methods of communication within a media context.

2.2 Critically compare a

range of communication

methods used to convey meaning in creative media production.

2.2 The evidence required here is an evaluation of the style of the magazine cover/spread, target audience and comparing to other rival brands.

Unit 2:

1. Understand design and research tools, methods and skills used in creative media production.

1.1 Critically compare a range

of research tools, methods and skills.

1.1 A comparison of the different available research methods and which would be the best way of conducting the research/why?

Learning Outcomes

Assessment Criteria

Evidence to be produced

Completed

2. Understand primary

and secondary research sources.

2.1 Critically compare a range

of primary and secondary

research sources.

2.1 A comparison of the two types of research and which one would be the best for my project/why?

Learning Outcomes

Assessment Criteria

Evidence to be produced

Completed

3. Be able to use design

and research tools,

methods and skills to

inform ideas for creative media production.

3.1 Apply design and

research tools, methods

and skills to record and

interpret information and

develop ideas for

creative production.

3.2 Evaluate the effectiveness

of design and research

tools methods and skills

to develop ideas for creative production.

3.1 Evidence of the actual research itself having been carried out.

3.2 An evaluation of the whole research process of the effectiveness, and how it helped me in my project as a whole.

Unit 3:

1. Understand progression

opportunities within the creative media sector.

2. Understand the skills

needed to pursue a career

in the creative media sector.

1.1 Locate, access and use

information to support own development.

2.1 Critically evaluate a range

of working practices and

methods.

1.1 An explanation of what jobs there are in the industry which theses skills could equip me to do.

2.1 Identification and explanation of what skills I used to create the spread and cover.

3. Be able to carry out roles

and responsibilities

consistent with

professional practice.

2.2 Apply knowledge of

working practices to

support own

development.

3.1 Organise self and work

to meet deadlines and

targets.

3.2 Demonstrate

consideration and

professionalism in working

with others.

2.2 An explanation of the skills I used during the process of creating my cover/spread, as well as identifying what jobs use the skills I have used.

3.1 Evidence of all my work being handed it in on time! Writing out my own evidence list. (this criteria list)

3.2 Evidence of Conducting interviews/recording it with professionalism. Also including proof of professional teamwork and helping others when necessary.

  Unit 4:

1. Understand critical

perspectives that

influence the analysis

of creative media

production active

ties.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Understand the contexts

within which creative

media technology and

production are positioned.

1.1 Compare a range of

critical perspectives

that influence the analysis

of creative media

production activities.

 

1.2 Apply knowledge of

critical perspectives to

the analysis of a range

of creative media

production activities.

 

1.3 Apply knowledge and

understanding of critical

perspectives to support

own practice.

 

2.1 Apply an understanding

of a range of contextual

parameters to support

own creative

development.

 

2.2 Apply an understanding

of a range of contextual

parameters to support

own creative

development.

1.1 Comparison of the magazine issues, covers and spreads relating to the language, narrative, text, pictures, covers and how it suits the target audience.

 

 

1.2 Use this knowledge to compare it to different mediums

 

 

1.3 Apply this knowledge to my own project and state the critical perspectives within my own magazine.

 

2.1 Evidence needed is an evaluation of the skills and areas in media industry this project/ skills set applies to.

 

 

 

2.2 Evidence here is showing an understanding of skills used in the industry and where they are used in used in my project, also including job role areas.

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Final project 1: project brief and criteria checklist.

Week 9- Jobs in the newspaper industry

This afternoon, we looked how our newspaper industry is changing in relating to the number of jobs being available and the increasing level of technology used within it. We also located three job roles using the internet and created an advert advertising one of the job roles we have researched. And finally, I have reflected on y ideal job role for my career and also on the experience and skills that I will require.

Firstly, there are many jobs that art involved with the print-journalism and these involve: newspaper, magazine and radio editor; the reporter and the journalist/researcher for a topic- the journalist also researches the topic themselves. The graphic designer, photographer/ photo journalist all play a vital role in the industry along with the proof-reader, web content manager, and even the website blogger. The editorial assistant, anyone in advertising, and the PR manager are all roles in the print-journalism industry.

All of these jobs can be affected by the changes that are occurring in the industry and below is an explanation and short note on how and why this is happening.

How the rise of the internet is changing the nature and existence of some roles and what they are being replaced with and how.

There is much more unemployment in the area due to the technology affecting people’s ability to earn a living (taking their jobs). Machines are now doing the skills what human can/used to do (language translation online whereas a human was required before). Speech recognition on phones etc. There is also an existing economy with a lot of production but not much human work, with ‘Robotics challenge’- robots with the skills to do a job. There is now word that the most important developments in human history are: steam engines /industrial revolution inventions that ‘mocked’ what had existed before. Economies run on ideas and the technological world becoming more transparent and more inclusive. Humans are freed up to do other things from the increased technology and Will reduce poverty and learn to live more lightly. It will make a mockery to everything that existed; Removing more redundant ideas; Saving time- journalists had to travel before but Skype and phones can give this information and the impact on society- making it more economical viable.

The way that technology is changing in our world and our world itself is having a massive impact on many things: the way we use it, what we use it for, the way we depend on it every day and even some of our job roles within any area of work but also the journalism industry. Firstly, the use of machines and mechanical robots are known to be raising the level of unemployment due to their abilities to do what us humans could do as well- including doing our jobs. This has been known to raise unemployment, redundancy and even people’s ability to earn a living. This was believed to soon turn our society into a place with a lot of production but not much work. However, there has been some known positives within this constant evolution: for example, as a journalist you was required to travel far away to many different places just to gain research. But now we have the internet, phones and Skype to get our information; we have voice recognition on our mobile phones/devices to help with work and reminders, not to mention the technological voice translations we now have whereas before, we always needed another human to translate for us. But apart from job role benefits, it means that we will have more free time for other things, will save time (particularly for journalists) and produce a more viable economic society and even produce more good quality good and/or quality of work.

All of these points prove that as journalists it means that we are required to be much more up to speed and up to date with all the latest technology as it is constantly and rapidly changing and the news is being displayed to us in all of these forever-changing ways.  We can be more financially and viable and efficient within many businesses and our own company. As a journalist, it frees up much more time for research, travelling to obtain research and also for video/audio-editing; technology nowadays is evolving to the point where we can now edit video and audio to a good quality on our computers, laptops and, in some cases, our phones.

 

Week 9- Jobs in the newspaper industry

Week 9- Evaluation of skills learned this week.

This week, one of the skills I’ve learned includes using Adobe InDesign to recreate a newspaper page from an actual newspaper. What I did was pick an existing newspaper page and re-create the layout, text, colours, format and pictures on it as close to the real thing as possible. But what I also had to do was measure each picture, text/text box and even the perimeter of the newspaper page itself because I wanted it to be as close to the real thing and so that if it was printed out, it would come out as close to it as possible too. Within the media industry, this can be applied to jobs such as newspaper and magazine designers and even journalists who specialise in photography since they will need to understand how to arrange different items and text to make them look professional and readable. This task this week required a number of skills- most of them were used in Adobe InDesign and involved applying the text in the font(s) and colour(s) that resembled the one on the actual newspaper page. This also applied to the pictures, text boxes and the overall layout of the page. But in order to achieve a perfect copy of the original, I had to measure everything (in millimetres) and apply them to the page size and the sizes of all the components. This was a vital skill which I had to use but is definitely used widely in the industry because means that the components of the newspaper page (pictures, text, headlines) can be placed into their correct positions based on their sizes/measurements and if the correct newspaper page size is put into the software, it means that when it gets printed, the layout will fill up on the page perfectly with no large spaces or careless overlapping. And the purpose of the skills I use in Adobe InDesign was to ensure that my copy of the newspaper page looked almost exactly like the original. For example, all the basic tools like the column tool, text and fonts tool, getting the pictures of the correct sizes ad quality, and entering the size of the page that I required too.

Another skills we learned this week was understanding how different forms of punctuation and grammar are used in pieces of writing to make them of a professional standard. This particular skill included using punctuation like colons, semi-colons, commas and capital letters in their correct places as well as understanding WHY they’d be used in this way too. This skills is of absolute importance in jobs such as any journalism, radio and interview scripts and when it comes to writing the actual report or article because if there are any spelling, punctuation and/or grammar mistakes, it makes the whole piece look very unprofessional and somewhat childish as well. And with grammar, it’s very important to put apply this correctly because it needs to written in a way that will make sense to the audience but also relates to the topic. In the industry, the workers or journalists producing the articles or scripts will most probable have proof-readers who would check their work before publication to ensure that all grammar, punctuation and even tenses are perfect. However, the overall purpose of these skills is to ensure that the best quality of the reports and articles are recognised by the target audience and that no grammatical errors including punctuation make their way into any form of writing or any form of media.

And finally, we also learned how to recognise and see what makes an ‘active’ news headline and what it actually means for a news headline to be ‘active’. This also applied to opening paragraphs and possibly sub-headings for news reports. We learned that it meant a headline would be containing verbs but also what the point of the report is; where the action has occurred and at what time the action happened.

And any active headline/opening paragraph contains all these elements in less than or in 25 words. This skill (just like the grammar and punctuation) applies to many jobs within the media industry such as journalism, radio reporting possibly and the writer who produces the final report/article. Learning how to use these skills is extremely useful and important because by just reading the headline and/or opening paragraph, it basically summarises the whole report in less than 25 words. This may make it easier for the reader to understand what the article is about rather than reading massive whole chunks of information and possibly becoming confused. An active headline also includes the three main points of the report as well, so it gives the reader a choice to decide whether or not they want to carry on reading, since all the information is given to them in 25 words or less- before they’ve even begun reading properly!

 

Week 9- Evaluation of skills learned this week.

Week 9- News Diary

week 9- news diary

The main focus of my news diary this week is going to be based around the Paris attacks that occurred last week:

The Paris attacks.

On Friday the 13th November 2015, the French capital of Paris experienced many deadly attacks that were carried out by, what was immediately presumed, ISIS. The attacks consisted of suicide bombers, gunshots and the death/murder of at least 129 people, along with hundreds of others wounded. They also took place in multiple areas of Paris such as bars, restaurants, a concert hall and a major football stadium- where a game was being played between France and Germany. One bomber, who detonated one of the bombs outside the stadium was known to be registered as a ‘refugee’ since his fingerprints were traced back to Greece. And although a number of arrests have been made to suspects of the massacre, one suspects by the name of Salah Abdeslam is the main focus for the police to find. His bother, Brahim Abdeslam was reported dead and the ‘suspected ringleader’ Abdelhamid Abaaoud was also reported dead as the result of a raid.

This is a recent news story that has hit the breaking headlines and been reported all over the media spectrum. This kind of event couldn’t get more serious because ISIS has found a way of entering Europe and into a country not far away from us, which may make the reader wonder what may happen to us if they access out country and if they will destroy our cities like they did in Paris. And also, the fact that they killed innocent people will have a huge impact on their families, friends, people who own the venues that were attacked and the whole country in general because they will think that the terrorist group will spread across the rest of the country. This story also questions the levels of urgency that the French government and our government also has against this because I personally believe and many others will also believe that they should have been much more prepared in case an event like this happened and possibly increased security for access into the countries too.

This news story has been displayed all over nearly every form of medium over the past week. These include on TV, newspaper and online newspapers. The reason for this could be because of the information being reported. For example, the TV can show footage of the events and interviews of the victims, police forces and government members. The newspaper, however, can actually provide us with more detailed information so that we can examine it more and read ‘between the lines’. And allowing us to come us with lour own thoughts and feelings about the attacks. However, this was useful for when it came to displaying the suspects photos on it since the reader could get to know who the members of ISIS/ involved terrorist were. Online news has been a massive part of this because there have always been constant updates to what the police have found out or what the French president’s plans are, etc. And there are always new subjects related to this everyday, so it allows the reported to quickly update the article whenever and wherever to keep up with the new topic and changing subjects.

This story has a number of target audiences: The families and friends of the victims/ people who died, the employees/owners of the venues attacked, the police (so that they get to know the suspects they’re hunting down) and also the government because they should know what exactly happened or is happening and how to deal with it. It may also promote the seriousness of the attacks and deaths and urge them to start coming up with a solution to the problem.

In terms of the best medium for covering this story, I believe that their isn’t really a best one because they are all used to provide different details, like ones listed above. And also, people would want to read about this story and its topics in their own way (online reports, videos, TV news) so it should be available in all these mediums for people to access. Plus it’s a story in such high demand at the moment that it can’t really afford not to appear in any of these mediums.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-34867615

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-34818994

Week 9- News Diary

Week 8- Research Profile: comparing research tools.

Unit 2-1.1: Critically compare research tools.

Since my survey was a form of quantitative research, I needed to ensure that all my questions fitted the characteristics of this form. Therefore, all my questions were closed and all had a set number of answers and tick boxes. That way, it would be much easy for me to analyse them at the end and put them into a data format. However, is till needed to make sure that all my questions related to my topic- David Cameron allowing 20,000 refugees into the UK over 5 years. I definitely conducted questions relating to this area but whilst I was thinking About it, I realised that there was much more to this topic than allowing them in and how the target audience might have felt, such as struggles that the government might face with funding and employment, and also introducing the topic with questions  like ‘are you currently aware of the Syrian war resulting in the refugee crisis?’ this questions still related to the topic but introduced it almost in a gentle way. As well as having to decide how to conduct my questions, I needed to do the same for my target audience. This was a little bit tricky because anybody could watch the news or read about it nowadays. However, I decided that my target audience would be college students (aged 16+) because these are the types of people who are likely to have the most understanding of the topic and its new and/or understand the questions my survey had to offer a little more. And because of this, I felt that they were the kind of people who felt the most confident in saying yes to answering my survey.

Overall, I have mixed feelings about the effectiveness of my survey. Firstly, I felt like it was a success in many ways because everybody who took the survey understood the topic from the first question because I purposely conducted a question that introduced the topic “Are you currently aware of the Syrian War resulting in the refugee crisis?” I also conducted questions that related specifically to the topic of David Cameron’s plan to allow them in, the refugee crisis itself and what the target audience felt about the whole issue- even with those questions I managed to make them closed by the tick boxes for each answer. However, when I was receiving some of the surveys back, I had a few comments written on them which meant I had made a few spelling errors of that some of the questions didn’t make sense that much. But after reading these comments and the part of my survey they related to, I realised that they were right in a way and that next time I will double-check each question carefully before publishing/printing out my survey. But overall, I feel that the questions I conducted for my survey were easy to understand and were related to the topic I was investigating and, as a result, I managed to get a suitable number of surveys completed and all the answers on each one completed too.

But although the questions were what I believe was a strong part f this research process, there were some drawbacks with the distribution of the surveys this was because I had originally posted them via my Facebook account because I thought that many people would become aware of them and be interested to complete them. However, by the end of the week I saw that I only had a total of four responses when I required a minimum of 20. this made me realise that Survey Monkey probably wasn’t the best method of gathering my survey answers for a number of reasons: maybe people didn’t get much information about it through it just being posted and it could have also been due to poor or no access at all for some people online. This is when I was advised to create a paper hand-out version of my survey to hand out to the people in my target audience around the college. Whilst doing this I found that this was a much better version of doing it than online because I was able to get the correct number of surveys completed in a much shorter amount of time plus analyse the answers and put them into a pie chart that same day.

If I was to do this again, I would use this experience as a lesson to do the whole survey as a paper hand-out, like this time because I would be most likely to have the same benefits I did this time: receiving the results back quickly and of the appropriate number of respondents to the surveys too. However, what I wouldn’t change would be the target audience of my survey because I still believe that my target audience of students aged 16+ and adults would have the most knowledge out of people who would have some or most knowledge of the topic, which would make it easier for them to answer the questions.

Unit 2-2.1: Critically compare a range of research tools.

At the very beginning of our lessons based around various forms of research, we have looked at two of the most heard-of forms of research. These are primary and secondary research. Here, I will be looking at the pros and cons of each form in relation to what I have carried out previously and about the biasness and influence of their primary research.

Firstly, Secondary research is a form of research that means that information is gathers for the user already. These include online news articles/reports, interviews, facts and even statistics. Whilst I was carrying out my secondary research, I looked at different online sources and websites for my information- which was based around the refugee crisis. Whilst doing this I also considered the pros and cons of this form of research:

Pros:

One obvious pro is that the research already exists and so, is ready to use and that it comes from a variety of sources such as online, newspapers, books and in some case, even family trees. Nearly all pieces of secondary research contain different pieces of information so you are probably more likely to learn more about a topic and adding to this, you are free to develop or expand on a piece of information to provide more facts and possibly opinions on it.

Cons:

However, some of the cons are: that if it’s an online source, others could possibly end up with the same information, and it may only be useful on the day of publication; the information may not even be true (especially if it comes from social media) along with some severe biasness within it. And finally, t could contain not enough or very vague information and use of slang (particularly if it comes from social media).

We also looked at and carried out some primary research too. This form is very different to secondary because the researcher carries out the research to find the information themselves. The information they gather can very from vox pops, face-to-face interviews to questionnaires and surveys- both of which can be put into statistical data. The research I carried out applied to nearly all of these; I went out into the city centre and interviewed the general public to generate my vox pops relating to the refugee crisis. And I also created a questionnaire which I handed out to various people around the college in order to gain responses to my topic which I could then put into a pie chart or other data format. In many ways, there are definitely a number of pros for primary research but on the flip side, there are always some cons too.

Pros:

Obviously, the research is your own so nobody else will have the same information as you, as well as the information being received may not be available anywhere else. There may be more value and trust in the research since it has been gathered by an individual and not come from any website etc and finally, it is most likely an up-to-date version since it has been taken for recent use,

Cons:

As for the cons: the research can be time-consuming and sometimes costly to gain the information (depending on the method)

When conducting wither of these types of research, it is vital that as much level of biasness possible is eliminated. This is because when the research levels are low, the whole report/article will be low of biasness too because the research is applied into it too. We considered what bias actually was in terms of research, where it may appear and how we could reduce the chance of it appearing in our research, whether it is secondary or primary. Within the secondary research, there was probably more of a chance of it being bias because it is a source of information that is provided by someone else and there could be a chance of: the information being edited in any way (especially on social media), only some of the information being available or correct and/or the information being made up of mainly or only opinions. This mostly applies to social media sources.

However, whilst conducting my secondary research, I ensured that I used a number of different forms of multimedia and sources so that I reduced the risks of the information being the same and I also searched for the same topic but of different elements of it so that I could examine the facts behind them and make certain that they were also from trusted sources like online newspapers for example.

As for primary research, this was easier for me to reduce the biasness in because I was in control of the process and it was my decisions to decide what methods I used to gather the research. I could reduce the levels of biasness in any way I felt was appropriate. But this is referring to the primary research I carried out, although I could apply this to any other form of primary research being carried out by anyone. The reasons this form of research could be less likely to be bias is because: The researcher can choose a method that will reduce the levels of biasness and fit in with their research form and topic being investigated. This means that they can design a method of research such as surveys and interview questions so that they are open, neutral and reduce the risk of pressuring the interviewee into answering it a certain way.

Week 8- Research Profile: comparing research tools.

Week 7: Quantitative and Qualitative research.

This afternoon, we have focused on two new types of research: quantitative and qualitative. I have outlined the definitions of each one along with the pros and cons of using each one, examples and a completed method of gathering information: n this case, mine was a survey created on my recent topic- the refugee crisis.

Quantitative research- This type of research is the type which mainly involves numerical results and is number based. This includes using statistics, facts involving numbers and percentages too. However, the data being researched or gathered must include closed questions. This would include questions that only involve a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer, tick boxes or a limited number of set answers. As a result of this, the best way to gain these research findings are well-structured questionnaires and surveys. An example would be a question based on which political party people want to vote for next. This question would have a possible tick box selection of set answers. This is good because it means that people don’t go off the subject when answering and it makes it much more useful for analysing and putting into data format.

Pros:

An important pro is that it is unbiased so it provides a more fairer piece of research. It is also easier to complete; you can reach a larger audience over a vox pop/qualitative, and you are more likely to get direct answers. The research findings are easy to create, analyse and compare since they are made for statistics. And finally, it’s more objective and means that its less likely to be bias,

Con:

However, since the answers are fixed, you are less likely to get the ‘feeling’ from them and may be emotionless and inhumane at times. This research could be a more expensive procedure, particularly if paper and ink is being used and limits the response and can’t get the detail you might want/need. A major con is that you can’t explain the topic as well with the survey,

 

Qualitative research- Unlike quantitative research, this type involves much more detail within a respond or the findings and is used to gain more of an insight to a topic, reasons and is more literal and involves more words than numbers when carrying this out. Carrying out this research is a bit more complex because the responds and finding may be so too. For example, focus groups, one-to-one interviews and questionnaires which allow the respondent to express their full opinion on a question.

Pros:

The answers being asked are open, so the response will be in more detail, and possibly more information about a topic is transferred because of the broader questions, data which consists more of words and text. Qualitative research uses descriptive and analysed sentences more, which delivers more facts and information to explore a topic where little is known.

* There is known to be more information, detail and even importance shown in a study with this method. An important pro for this is that it’s subjective, meaning that it’s more for people to give their own opinions. It can seek an individual’s experience to gain a further understanding of the topic. As for the audience sizes, the data can range from a small number of individuals to a large number; meaning that the group sizes are adjustable, and it holds a much more flexible structure for evaluation criteria.

Qualitative research also uses features like vox pops, involving primary research and resulting in more credibility and is instant; can be emotive features in them and it even humanizes and helps audience relate more to a story.

Cons:

Even though this method is subjective, it could result in being biased in places, and the answers can end up long-winded and off the theme at times. The answers may also be irrelevant or unrelated to the topic and they can’t put it into data because the research method is more words and text based- as a result, it’s harder to summaries the data or in general. It can be time-consuming, costly and requires more time to complete, resulting in a lower return rate if embedded in a survey.

What we also did this afternoon was use an example to quantitative research to gain other people’s opinion on the topics we have been investigating so far- In my case, the refugees being allowed into the UK. what I did was create a survey using ‘Survey Monkey’ which allowed me to create a free online survey which I could distribute to everyone using social media, like Facebook for example. This was a good method because it meant that I could create this survey to suit the type of research I carry out; If I was using qualitative research then I would be able to apply features like answer boxes. But as I was carrying out quantitative research, I was able to apply tick boxes with the answers next to them. This website and method of research is great for customizing my survey relating to the type of research I was carrying out or any other research in the future.

I have also included a screenshot of the designed survey along with some of the responses I have received from it.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/analyze/lDlbJYpSmcsKQyxsR_2FxC5nop4B2Q2ssrguZ6OSKJc_2BQ_3D

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However, we were given a time period for all our responses to be collected in by. and at the end of it I only received a total of four responses. This was when I decided to so paper hand-outs of my survey to speed us the whole research process and get the required number of responses I needed.

refugee Questionnaire

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At the bottom here I have also included my research findings along with the pie charts I have created for each question:

  1. Are you currently aware of the Syrian war resulting in the refugee crisis?

Chart1.crtx

This chart shows that 95% of people who took the questionnaire were aware of the refugee crisis prior to answering it compared to the other 5% who didn’t know anything about it.

2.Do you feel sympaphy for these refugees looking for a new home?

chart 2

This chart shows that 90% have some sympaphy for the refugees looking for a new home against the 10% who don’t feel any sympaphy for them.

3. To what extent do you agree that David Cameron will allow 20,000 refugees in the UK over 5 years?

chart 3

My findings show that 45% (almost half) of the respondents didn’t know whether or not they agreed to David Cameron’s plan to allow the refugees in. Very few- as little 30% replied that they agreed or strongly agreed to David Cameron’s refugee plans.

 

4. Do you think that our country will hold this number of refugees?

chart 4

This chart clearly shows that over half of the respondents at 55% thought that the country wouldn’t be able to hold 20,000 refugees, compared to the 45% which believed it would be able to hold them.

5. Do you think that the government should help them out sooner?

chart 5

A massive chunk of the total respondents, totalling 85%, said they think the government should help out the refugees sooner. However, a total percentage of 15% believed that the government shouldn’t do this.

6. Do you think that this number of refugees will affect the unemployment rate in the UK?

chart 6

The overall percentage of 85% tells us that this percentage of people think that  this percentage of people think the unemployment will be affected by the refugees compared to the 15% who believe it won’t affect it. 

7. If so, to what extent do you agree?

chart 7

This chart tells us that: one quarter of the respondents (25%) think that the unemployment rate will be strongly affected by the refugees. However, half of the respondents (50%) only agree that it will affect it but 20% are now so sure about their levels of agreement. but none of the respondents disagree or strongly disagree. 

8. Do you believe that its unfair for the Syrians to leave home because of a war that won’t stop?

chart 8

Overall, 75% of the respondents definitely feel that it’s unfair for the Syrians to leave their home  when it wasn’t their fault. however, one quarter (25%) believe the opposite- that they don’t feel it’s unfair to them. 

9. Do you think that the government will be able to fund all 20,000 refugees?

chart 9

This final pie chart tells us that more than half (65%) of the respondents believe that the refugees will not be treated so well in the UK. This is seriously outweighing all the other answers, with : 5% each believing they will be treated well and who aren’t sure, 20% who believe they won’t be treated well and 10% who think they won’t be at all.

10. How do you feel the refugees are going to be treated in the UK?

chart 10

This final pie chart shows that: around 65% believe the refugees will not be treated so well here in the UK, compared to a staggering 5% each of those who think they will be treated very well or who aren’t sure. 20% think they will be treated will and 10% think they won’t be treated well at all.

 

Week 7: Quantitative and Qualitative research.

Week 9- News Writing Introduction: Grammar, punctuation and 25 words.

This morning, we were introduced to the topic of ‘The print industry’ where we learned about the history of the print industry and how it all changed throughout time:

The print industry

The whole story begun in 1450 when Johannes Gutenburg built the world’s first printing press to exist, which he named the ‘Gutenburg press’ after himself. But before 1450 when Gutenburg built this invention, the only way that any form of information and literacy could exist was if it was written out by hand and even then, it would take around 2-3 years to complete just one copy. The bible is a good example since it was one of the first books to be printed and this one did take 2-3 years to write out. And as a result, not many sources of written information existed and mainly only monks and the 1% of the population could read, write and understand the texts.

It turned out that during this era, all sources of information was controlled by the Catholic Church in Europe. An example would include a time when people believed that spiders had only six legs, and this was an actually spoken fact from the church. No one thought to challenge this thought because the church held all power to the information.

But by 1550, because of the printing press being used more and becoming more popular, the number of books that existed rose dramatically from 20,000 to 200,000 over a 50 year period- which also had a massive increase on the written word too. But this increase in the written word had its consequences relating to the bible; if it was translated into common English by anyone it would result in death. This was because everyone believed that it meant the church had no power over it then.

But even though it had one major consequence if mistreated, it also came with benefits: People would be starting to make more money and would also start learning more and becoming more able to read and possibly write. It also aided the use of keeping track of large amounts of money made and even the standardisation of language and numbers within it- meaning that everybody would be receiving the same item of print and be able to understand more as well. But what else could happen was that the same information could be transferred and any human errors made could be quickly disseminated (spread around). However, there were three types of information that was basically what kept the society together mainly from 1500 to 1600. These were: scientific method, record keeping, and books.

As for the scientific information, it was until the 1500s when monks were discovering all the science behind things and would observe things to gather their findings.

But shortly after that, the increasing knowledge of the general population and growing middle class of merchants who could read, started to challenge the power of the church and question whether or not it was true or just a belief.

Another event related to the print industry which occurred during 1500s was when America was discovered for trading with the Far East for colonisation. This was also the time when images and even scientific drawings could be printed as well as the written language itself. This also included maps. Before maps were printed in this time, people used to carve them out on to copper and wax was applied to prevent them from running or becoming unreadable. But they were able to be printed along with images and other drawings.

It wasn’t until the 1600s until newspapers started to originate and the oldest newspaper to exists is ‘The Oxford Gazette’ (which came about in the 1690s. from the late 1600 to roughly the 1700s, the empires came into existence.

 

This afternoon, we have also looked at and tested our understanding on our grammar and punctuation skills but also the importance of having these skills in order to master them and produce ‘professional-standard’ writing.

Firstly, becoming a professional writer doesn’t just mean writing outstanding pieces of work. It also requires a great number of skills to ensure that gramma, punctuation is perfect and that the sentence makes sense as a whole. This is what we investigated today when we did some sentence exercises in class. What happened was we were given a sentence with no punctuation an grammar errors in it too. And out task was to write out the sentence and then write it out again but with all the correct punctuation and grammar. the sentence was:

“a woman without her man is nothing.”

This was the correct version of it which i wrote: “A woman; without her man is nothing.”

However, we found out that just by using different forms of punctuation in different places turns the whole meaning of the sentence around. For example, another student re-wrote it as, “A woman; without her man, is nothing.” This turned a whole new turn to the meaning of the sentence and this was something I will definitely consider when creating my written pieces in the future. We also completed some more exercises based on different sentences. We were given the number of grammar errors there were in each and we had to re-write them (just like before) and count up the number of changes we made to see if we got not only all the errors correct but to see if our skills were as good as we thought they were.

After that one, we were given more sentences with grammar and punctuational errors in them. Here, the first sentence is the one we were given to correct. The one after that is is the one I corrected with all the correct punctuation and grammar applied.

  1. charles dickens wrote a tale of two cities little dorrit a christmas carol and bleak house among others

(My answer)- Charles Dickens wrote: ‘A Tale of Two Cities‘, ‘Little Dorrit‘, ‘a Christmas Carol and ‘Bleak House among others.

2) i took five items my jacket a fishing rod a peanut-butter sandwich some cadburys chocolate and a pen knife.

(My answer)- I took five items: my jacket, a fishing rod, a peanut-butter sandwich, some Cadburys chocolate and a pen knife.

3) the guests arrived early lady posonby in diamons and a white fur coat lord brabourne with a glamorous girl on each arm mr corruthers with half the contents of a bottle of whisky already under his belt and the honorable miss hilly flower in a very short very shiny dress

(My answer)- The guests arrived early: Lady Posonby in diamonds and a fur white coat, Lord Brabourne with a glamorous girl on each arm, Mr Carruthers with half the contents of a bottle of whisky already under his belt and the honourable Miss Hilly Flower in a very short, very shiny dress.

4) mr montague was running late he called me and said im sorry ive been caught behind traffic i will be there soon

(My answer)- Mr Montague was running late. He called me and said: “I’m so sorry, I’ve been caught in traffic. I will be there soon.”

5) his words echoed in my head to unto others only good

(My answer)- His words echoed in my head: “do unto others only good.”

6) the mediterranean se is a favorite holiday destination for british tourists

(My answer)- The Mediterranean Sea is a favourite holiday destination for British tourists.

 

After that we looked at the defenition and evaluated our understanding on the importance of an ‘active’ and first 25 words to an article or headline actually means.

For an article to be ‘active’ it means that the headline or first paragraph, sentence to it has verbs and phrases that symbolise action. The whole point of this ‘active’ headline or paragraph is to almost summaried the whole story in or less than 25 words; almost no article that exists will have a headline, subheadline or opening paragraph that is more than 25 words. We also found out that there are three main elements that appear in almost every news headline and.or paragraph. These include: What- What the point of the report is or what is happening; Where- Where this report took place; Time- the time in which the events in the report occured.

We looked at an example from the BBC website which looked at the terrorist massacre which took place last Friday:

Paris attacks: Hollande says ‘France is at war’

16 November 2015 Last updated at 15:49 GMT

‘French President Francois Hollande has described Friday’s attacks in Paris as “an act of war” committed by Islamic State militants.’

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-34836367

This headline is a good example of being active because it summarises the whole point of the article in only eight words. But alongside this, the first paragraph is an excellent active example because it contains all the three elements I said any active headline or paragraph should contain: It also summaries the report in 20 words, it states the ‘what’ (‘described… as “an act of war”) the ‘where’ (‘attacks in Paris’) and the ‘time’ (‘Friday’s attacks).No only does an active headline and paragraph like this or any in fact make it more convenient to save time and space but it may also be handy for the reader as it is put into an easier language to understand.

 

Week 9- News Writing Introduction: Grammar, punctuation and 25 words.